Dealing with Mobility Issues

For the month of October I have joined bloggers from all over the world to write for 31 days. This month I chose the category of family life over at the Nesting Place. If you are just here for the first time here is a link to the first day and all the others in between.

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As I sit here this morning on the Sunday before our Canadian Thanksgiving, I am thankful for the friends and family that have supported me over the last couple of years. You see, I have had to deal with injury over the last two years. My injury and subsequent surgeries kept me from doing a lot of the daily activities and every time I get outside and am able to work in my garden, I thank you. It’s funny how we take things like walking for granted. I know I did. I had never experienced a serious break or fall until two years ago. It was life changing. My usually dependent self had to rely on others for help. That’s so hard to do but it was necessary. I doubt I was an ideal patient knowing how stubborn I can be.

Someone said to me once, that everything happens for a reason. I don’t agree. People getting sick doesn’t happen for a reason. One thing it did for me was to see how inadequate our community was for accessibility. I now sit on a board that discusses mobility issues in our community. There is nothing worse than feeling like you are going to faceplant yourself just getting off a curb. We often think that it’s just the elderly that have mobility issues. Look around, there are the visually and hearing impaired, the children with an impairment and  young moms pushing twin strollers.

In the future, I hope to see wider doorways, automatic doors and level sidewalks. I know what you are thinking, it doesn’t affect me. Well, it’s just as hard to get a large stroller in and out of a door as it is a wheelchair. Just ask any parent. Some time or another, mobility issues will come into your life. It may be your aging parents or a friend in need, but it will happen.

I was very excited to see that our small town is actually fixing the sidewalks in the older part of town. May I never roll backyards into a curb again or trip on a heaved sidewalk. Please support the city while this work is being done. It’s to make our community a safer one for all of us.

Happy Thanksgiving!!

family life

 

 

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7 thoughts on “Dealing with Mobility Issues

  1. After injuring myself caring for my sweet Mother In Love, I had 6 surgeries in 3 years. I can’t get on my knees again and my back won’t tolerate bending over and weeding. I miss getting down and working the soil. That said, I have been having a ball with planning some vertical gardens and elevated beds. I have broken both wrists from “catching” myself when I fall, to avoid that face plant fear. Mobility issues are a tough challenge! But your blog is very helpful in keeping ME involved in my garden therapy. I applaud businesses and communities who think about how they can make places more accessible for everyone! Even something as simple as painting the edges of stairs for those of us who must think about every step we take, as well as those who have visual challenges, is a major help to us.
    Thank you for bringing this subject up! It’s a hard thing to admit when we can’t do the things we used to do without giving them a second thought. Game changer indeed, but it’s a challenge we adjust to and it’s so nice for others to be thoughtful. I don’t think we are “given” these challenges either. They happen and we do our best to overcome them and grow even better and more compassionate toward others. Kudos to you for not letting it define who you are!

    • I have had to adjust the way I garden and as you probably know it is my passion. I was able to find a pair of long handled grass shears that enabled me to cut back my plants in the fall and I also use a kneeling stool for support when needing to get up and down. I absolutely recommend raised beds about 20″ high with an edge around them to sit on. Glad you are enjoying vertical gardens, Marilyn.

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